Restaurants in Brazil

While your hotel will often include breakfast, you are most likely going to eat the majority of your meals at restaurants when vacationing, and there are some important things you will want to know about doing so.

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Beach front restaurants tend to have a building, but everyone sits on the beach under the parasols

At many restaurants in Brazil, they will have entrees for two, three, or even four people. While there will also be meals for one, I have found the norm to be at least two. There should be some sort of indication of the number of people each meal serves. You may have to scan the menu to find where it indicates though, as, like in Canada, menu designs vary wildly from restaurants to restaurant. If you don’t know, it is always best to ask. Most restaurants, in my experience, will have someone working that speaks English at all times, or if you have prepared your phone properly, you’ll be able to translate what you need – but worst case scenario, you can always pantomime for a question like that. Personally, I find the serving sizes are a bit small in Brazil, and I once basically ate a meal for three people by myself, but I think that’s more of a personal thing, than Brazil vs. Canada.

One thing that it always takes me a bit to remember at Brazilian restaurants, is that the servers do not come to the table unless called over. There is no checking if your food came out right, there is no asking if you need anything else. Instead, the server stays at the back of the restaurant and watches the tables from afar. You simply raise your hand and wave them over if you need anything. This is extremely convenient, as your table will not be interrupted in the middle of a story, nor do you have a server come by just as you’ve taken a bite to ask about the food, and generally the server will come by faster. As a Canadian, it feels rude to wave at the servers like that, but it really is a better system.

Taxes are included in the menu price, but the tip is not. A 10% tip is added to the end of the bill automatically, so the total of the bill will be the total you should pay – you do not need to tip anything above the amount they add. I find that I already calculate an additional amount in my head, because of the crazy Canadian system of adding taxes after the advertised price, and so I never really experience any sticker shock when the bill arrives like I assume most Europeans would. The automatic tip amount is also simpler than trying to decide if the waiter brought your drink out fast enough to warrant an extra percentage, although I still think it would be best to just pay servers a proper wage. You can ask to remove the tip if you choose, but that is just as awkward as you imagine it to be.

Driving in Brazil – Don’t.

I highly discourage Canadians visiting Brazil from renting a car, or driving locally.

Some people when visiting another country like to rent a car to see the sights. In fact, I have heard anecdotes of Canadians (or even Americans) taking day trips in foreign countries that to the locals would take the better part of a week.   It is easy to get lulled into a sense of confidence in Brazil, because their road signs are strongly based on the US Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices Standard, which is used in the USA and is very similar to Canada’s own version. The major difference being that their signs are in Portuguese.

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Other than the Portuguese, this sign wouldn’t seem out of place in Canada

However, this is not a good idea to do in Brazil.  There are multiple reasons for this.

Brazilians are extremely aggressive drivers compared to Canadians. You may regularly find them running red lights, and disobeying other traffic laws. As much as you may occasionally see a motorcycle in Canada weave through traffic, this is something we experience at almost every stop when I am out with Minha Namorada (My Girlfriend) – and they will squeeze through the smallest of gaps. Additionally, cars will often drive  erratically, seemingly without regard to the other vehicles on the road. If you grew up with this, then you’d be fine.  But for a Canadian that is accustomed to having a lot more space, it is extremely disconcerting.

Additionally, directions can be difficult. Google Maps may send you through the Favelas rather than taking you the longer, but safer route. This happens much less if you have internet on your phone, but it is always better to be with an experienced driver who can recognize the signs before you enter into the wrong part of town – I know I’m not good at noticing.  Distracting driving laws also mean you can’t use your phone while behind the wheel, making it that much harder to get where you want to go.

Finally, road quality can be an issue. This is not to say that Canadian roads are always better – about 60% of Canada’s roads are unpaved, but you don’t want to hit a pothole and get stuck in the middle of nowhere, hoping that the next person to come your way will stop and help you.  This would be especially worrisome if you don’t speak Portuguese.

The better options are to arrange travel between cities with your travel agent ahead of time, and to use Uber or have your hotel arrange a taxi for you. Uber is generally safer, as you can quickly look at the driver’s history (rating, number of rides, etc.), but I also understand that many people will not feel comfortable getting into an unknown person’s car. So, note the Canadian Government’s suggestions on taxi travel in Brazil:

  • Local law requires the use of the taxi meter to determine the legal fare. Adding surcharges to a fare is illegal.

    Should taxi rates change and their taxi meters have not been adjusted, drivers may indicate these changes by showing an authorized paper with the new fares.

    Many tourists hire “radio taxis”, also known as “commun taxis.” These taxis operate at a fixed price irrespective of the time of the day and the time it takes to arrive at your destination.

    • Only use official taxis
    • Upon arrival to Brazil, purchase your fare from licensed taxi offices in the airport arrival hall or near the taxi queues
    • During your stay, use licensed taxis from taxi stands

https://travel.gc.ca/destinations/brazil

Do not use the buses, or any form of public transit at night.

If you do insist on driving, Brazil allows Canadians to drive for up to 180 days with a Canadian Drivers’ License, although its recommended you get an international drivers’ permit, and have a translation of your license.  Brazil has a zero tolerance for drinking and driving (0.00%), with heavy fines or jail time should you be caught.

Stray animals in Brazil

Unfortunately, Brazil has a problem with many stray animals. It is likely you will see stray dogs and cats scrounging for food, or lounging in the shade during the heat of the day. Like in Canada, you should not feed these animals. You don’t know where they have been, you don’t know if they might bite, or if they have diseases.

It is an unfortunate situation to be sure, but the animals are actually fairly well socialized. Generally speaking while dogs might look at you to see if you will feed them, they largely don’t get too close. They are equally wary of humans (probably a lot have been abused). Lots of people do throw scraps and other food to the animals, so don’t be fearful that they won’t be eating.

I find cats are actually more willing to come to the table and beg for food directly. At one restaurant, I was sitting outside (as I usually do in Brazil) and I repeatedly had to shoo away a cat who wanted to jump up on my lap and share my dinner. It broke my heart to say no, but I didn’t know if the cat was healthy. I did realize the reason the cat was so intrusive, the owner of the restaurant regularly fed this cat. He even let it into his house (attached to the restaurant), although very obviously had taken measures to prevent it entering into his kitchen.

It is very hard to see these animals and not want to take them home with you. But, it definitely reinforced the importance of Bob Barker’s classic sign-offs, “don’t forget to spay and neuter your pets”.

Don’t think for a second that Brazilians don’t like animals though. Lots of people do have dogs and cats as pets though. And just like anywhere else these pet owners clearly spoil their pets. I do wonder how the animals stay cool enough with their thick coats of fur, but anytime of day you’ll see lots of pets taking a walk with their humans, exploring every interesting smell along the way, happy as can be.

Exercising in Brazil

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Now, I understand that many people don’t exercise, or work out when on vacation. But, just as many like actually enjoy their workout, and so keep to their routine when travelling. However, there are some important things to consider when doing your workout in Brazil.

While Minha Namorada (my girlfriend) will sometimes mention that Toronto, on its hottest summer days, is worse than Brazil, she still considers Toronto to be very dry. So, the mix of the (low 30’s) heat in Brazil, and the high humidity makes working out that much harder. Perspiration doesn’t have the same ability to cool you down in humid weather so you will definitely overheat when in Brazil that much more.

Please note the below are my experience, and you really should talk to a medical professional before doing any sort of workout to ensure that you are healthy enough to partake. Talk to your doctor about what precautions you should take for the Brazilian climate.

Because of this increased heat, you have to take your workout slow. On the first day, I would do a maximum of 75% of my normal workout. While I might not get that same “runner’s high”, just as often I find myself “hitting the wall” much faster than normal. I never want to overdo it and ruin my ability to workout the next day, or, even worse, find myself too exhausted to enjoy the rest of your day. I never feel bad if I’m more exhausted than usual, as this is normal. I always remind myself, I’m basically running in a sauna compared to Canada. Sometimes, I actually need to lower my workout even further. By pacing my workout on the first day, I’m able to see how my body is reacting to the increased temperature without falling out of routine.

When working out indoors, I always make sure to turn on the air conditioner. While it will probably be off unless someone else is already using the gym, even turning it on over the length of a short workout can really help. Air conditioners control not only the heat, but also the humidity. By having one run, it will not only cool down the room, but also allow my body’s natural sweat to work better. It is also a wonderful after-workout treat to stand next to the air conditioning unit and just cool off. I think that’s better than any runner’s high.

It is also best to work out indoors. While the wind in many parts of Brazil may seem inviting, I never want to get lost in a city in which I’m not familiar. Most people seeking cardio want at least thirty minutes a day, and at light-jogging pace of eight kilometres per hour that’s about four kilometres, which is plenty of space to get lost. As well, it is safest in Brazil to stay in the crowded areas, which can be some of the most annoying places to jog, as that requires weaving through unpredictable crowds.

Finally, I always make sure to stay hydrated. While in Canada, I often don’t drink water before my workout – I know this isn’t the best idea, but I don’t like the sloshing feeling of the water in my belly as I run because it sometimes makes me feel nauseous. However, in Brazil this is a bad idea. I basically always feel thirsty in Brazil, and it is very easy to forget to drink water. That can easily lead to real problems, which is the opposite of what I want from a workout. For example, Heat Stroke is a real possibility in Brazil, and drinking sufficient fluids is a good preventative measure. I drink a fair amount of water before my workout, and I bring a water bottle with me when working out. Even without anything serious happening, failure to stay hydrated can increase recovery time exponentially, and that can ruin one a whole day in paradise.

Navigating São Paulo Airport (GRU)

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São Paulo/Guarulhos–Governador André Franco Montoro International Airport, courtesy of Andomenda [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/)%5D
The vast majority of flights through Brazil will at least have a stop over in São Paulo. São Paulo/Guarulhos–Governador André Franco Montoro International Airport (GRU) is basically the international hub for Brazil. This has many advantages and disadvantages because while you will almost always find staff who speak fluent English, it can be very overwhelming due to the size.

As I’m sure many of you do when checking in, I always like to double check when I need to pick up my bags. I am almost always told that they are checked all the way through to my final destination, but that is incorrect when travelling to Brazil (they do tend to be checked through when leaving Brazil). When going there, I have always had to pick up my bags in São Paulo. That makes sense when connecting, because they wouldn’t know to do a customs check when you arrive on your domestic connection (note: I have been to countries where a domestic connection somehow means you don’t actually go through customs). The airport staff in São Paulo will know for sure, but I am confident telling you that you will pick up your bags in São Paulo.

After picking up your bags in São Paulo, you have to go through customs. It is only a line, and you just walk through the door/aisle that applies to you – Red Sign/Items to declare, or Green Sign/No items to declare. They have border guards there who make random selections as well. It is important that you are not on your cell phone, and remove your hat/sunglasses when going through this section – they will stop you and make you remove them otherwise. In addition, when entering Brazil, you actually go through Duty Free Upon landing. I believe the current amount you can buy is $500 USD (~$650 Canadian), and the prices are very good. Just remember, you’ll be limited by Canada upon your return.

If you have a connection, you will have to check in again. The first time I flew through São Paulo, I almost missed my connection because of the check-in lines. What I did not realize, and is important to note, is that connection check-ins have their own dedicated lines. Generally I find I enter into the airport at the opposite end of the connection check-in, but follow the signs all the way to the front – don’t assume the line for check-in is the connections check-in until the sign specifically says so. The regular check-in lines sometimes appear to be hours-long, the connection line is usually five minutes.

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Airport Shuttle Bus

Since it is such a big airport, São Paulo actually has three terminals. The first number in your Gate (101, 207, 319) tells you from which terminal you are departing. While terminals 2 and 3 are connected, the walkway is very long, and it may be faster to take the shuttle bus (you will definitely need to take it to Terminal 1). There is signage, but I did find it a bit worrisome, because the shuttle bus is actually outside the front doors of the airport. I did not like having to leave the airport, but it is basically across the first street outside the door and there will be many other people also connecting – there is definitely comfort in numbers.

Terminal 3 has a bunch of nice restaurants and food, although at inflated airport prices (which makes them approximately normal Canadian prices). I find the best deal for food is the Pizza Hut Buffet (which also makes it very fast), although the beer there is more overpriced than most. Down the hall a little bit is a beer and snacks pub that has better prices for beer. Terminal 1 is very limited in restaurants post-security. There is a pizza place, a Pão de Queijo store, a Subway, and a couple minor food carts. There was a new place slated to open last time I went, but I don’t recall what it was. I have spent very limited time in Terminal 2, so I can’t speak to their restaurants.

Children’s Day

This weekend, as my Canadian Readers know, we celebrated Thanksgiving. A day to spend with friends or family, and remember what we are all thankful for. While this is not exclusively a Canadian/American holiday, it is not celebrated in most places around the world. And, especially given its association with the fall harvest, which isn’t the same “end of season” event in the land of eternal summer, it makes sense it is not celebrated in Brazil (although oddly, it is celebrated in some hot climates).

Even so, this weekend was a holiday weekend in Brazil – Children’s Day.

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Children’s Day, which actually exists around the world, is a fairly significant holiday in Brazil (unlike Canada), and by tradition is a gift-giving holiday, where parents buy toys for their children. Of greater significance, is that the more well-off people tend to buy gifts for children of the poor, and even host parties so that the kids can enjoy the day just like everyone else. Personally, I think sharing like this is a better way of showing thanks than most Canadian/American traditions. Donating money, and, more importantly, time gives back to the community, and definitely gives each person more perspective on what things for which we ought to be thankful.

Children’s Day falls on October 12th. And while most people remember it as Children’s day, like most Brazilian Holidays, it actually is associated with a religious holiday. It is Our Lady of Aparecida’s Day, being a Christian Feast Day in honour of the Patron Saint of Brazil, the Virgin Mary. Most people probably associate it with Children’s Day, simply because that’s how it was first introduced to them as a child – and any holiday that you get gifts as a child is a memorable one.

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The small terracotta Virgin Mary, representing Our Lady of Aparecida, to which many miracles have been attributed 

There are some less than proper motivations for the holiday as well, the history of the day actually comes from a marketing campaign to increase sales for toy companies, in part by Johnson & Johnson, in the 1960s. The day was initially celebrated in March (and was similar to Canada in that there was very little acknowledgement), but the marketing campaign was extremely successful and created the now well-known celebration. But this is true of many holidays, Santa Clause is significantly associated with Coca Cola, but Christmas is still special. In fact, some might argue the commercialization of Santa has helped spread the Christmas Spirit.

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It is an urban legend that Santa’s depiction comes from Coca-Cola because of very successful 1930s commercials.  Santa had already been depicted as such, and had even sold other soft drinks like Whit Rock Beverages

Food differences in Brazil

As I’ve written about before, one of the best ways to experience a culture is through their food. So much history and modern society go into meal preparation that no two places are similar. However, many people when travelling will find themselves still reverting to their old favourites – be it a type of food or drink. Often this is because we all get a little bit homesick, and whether it is just part of your normal morning routine, a quick bit to eat in the afternoon, or a late night midnight snack, food is one one of the best ways to feel at home. However, certain foods either don’t exist in Brazil, or exist in a form uncommon in Canada.

1. Diet Coke is rare. Diet coke is the second highest selling soda product (behind only classic) in America, but finding it in Brazil would be rare indeed. While places still sell Coca Cola, Coke Zero is the drink of choice for those trying to keep their calories down. If you are like me, and simply prefer the taste of Diet Coke (I find regular too sweet), you are simply out of luck to find this. If they don’t have Coke Zero, and you don’t want water, your most likely calorie free alternative to water is Guaraná Zero, which kind of tastes like ginger ale.

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This is a picture of the regular (full calorie) type.  The can even reminds me of ginger ale.  Salvarequejo [CC BY-SA 4.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)%5D

2. Corn is saltier in Brazil. While “sweet corn” is grown in both Canada and Brazil, Brazilians tend to use a one known as maíz elote. It is more white than the corn more commonly found in Canada, and is saltier than normally found here. If you have ever had corn from Chipotle, this is more similar to what you will find in Brazil.

3. Coffee is almost always espresso only. Due to the heat in Brazil, people generally don’t want something warm to drink for awhile. While they want the caffeine effects, and (for some) the flavour, they aren’t going to want a large cup to drink over the next ten to fifteen minutes. So, most places you find will only have espresso – even getting an americcano can be hard, although it is sometimes possible to get them to dilute the espresso in a glass of hot water. You might get some odd looks, but they can easily do it.

4. Pancakes and maple syrup don’t really exist. Pancakes are more commonly found as crepes, but tend to be served with savoury foods rather than sweet. Maple Syrup truly is a Canadian thing, and even finding normal american table syrup in restaurants is uncommon.

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Meu Cunhado (my brother-in-law), after trying some Maple Syrup I brought, described it as very similar to honey – which I thought was a very apt comparison.

When feeling homesick, the best way is to stick to brand name snack foods, or foods like fries, pizza, and chicken strips. As well, there is something reassuring, and yet mildly unnerving, that McDonald’s will be the same nearly anywhere you go in the world.

Journal Day 11

Day eleven in Brazil was spent exploring Pipa’s wonderful beaches. I had learned my lesson from the first day, and this time I wore more comfortable shoes that I could switch out of once I got to the beach so that my legs did not hurt walking traversing the hills to get to the beach.

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If you can believe it, the sky was even more blue than in this picture

 

Crab, along with other seafood, is inexpensive along the beach, but some restaurants try to trick tourists and have it surprisingly high in their menu. Doing a little bit of comparison between the adjacent restaurants can save you a bunch of money. I would also highly recommend you only eat at places that have the menu printed with the prices – some might try to overcharge you because you are a gringo, or, more innocently, there is far more opportunity for confusion without printed prices.

 

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Seafood in Northeastern Brazil is amazing!

Minha Namorada (my girlfriend) and I did notice that some of the prices for items from the various beach vendors would change if they heard me speaking. At least once they tried to change the price even after we’d already agreed to pay, but Minha Namorada pushed back and got the price we previously agreed – but you might not be travelling with a local like I was. That being said, the beach vendors do have products that work well – selfie sticks, underwater camera bags, beer, various types of food. Check out the stores as you are heading down to the beach, and you should know enough about local prices in order to haggle successfully. I would not recommend you buy sunglasses from any of the beach vendors though, as you can’t be sure about the UV protection, and sunglasses with no protection can actually be worse than none at all. So, it is important you buy proper sunglasses.

This day I had one of my favourite experiences to date, which was riding on a boat to see the dolphins. The dolphins were wild and just chose to swim near the people because they were as excited to see us as we were to see them. They even let you off the boat to swim in the same area, although the dolphins tended to keep their distance at that point. It was still well worth the money though, as there is something so much more majestic about seeing animals because they choose to see us, rather than seeing them in a zoo where they have no choice.

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Sadly, I didn’t get the dolphins on video, but I wouldn’t recommend you try – its too hard to capture, and you’ll end up missing opportunities to see them with your own eyes
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We found Aventureiro Pipa to be the best company for the boat tour, and they offered a money back guarantee if we didn’t see any dolphins.

We ended the day back downtown enjoying the nightlife. We stopped into a pizza place, because neither of us could decide what we wanted, and pizza is a good default food choice. What I did not expect is how lovely the local twist on pizza tastes. We had carne de sol pizza, which was absolutely wonderful, and I still find my mouth watering when I think about it. Foods like that are the reason I have to diet before I go. I think most people say they put on a pound a day when on a cruise ship, and I’m sure I’m the same when I visit Brazil.