Doctors in Brazil

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I sincerely hope you don’t get sick when on vacation. Brazil has some great doctors and clinics, but being sick during the holidays is just not fun. But, should you get sick, you should be assured that you will be in well-trained hands.

Should you have to go to the doctor for an emergency, remember that most travel insurance providers require you to call them prior to receiving treatment, or at least at your first opportunity – this can often be done by someone on your behalf if you are in a life-threatening situation. It is for this reason you should keep a copy of your insurance in your wallet, and a digital copy should be sent to one of your travelling companions before you go. That way, you can access it, and your friend can access it, should you need. Most travel insurers will help you find the right care, and from someone who speaks English, which is a lot more useful in an emergency.

However, you might get slightly sick in the country, but not so much that you consider it an emergency – what if you just catch a cold, or have a bad cough. Your travel insurance isn’t designed for this, but if you want to make sure it isn’t something more serious/get some advice on the correct over-the-counter remedy, you’ll want to talk with a doctor. Now, Canadians are scared about going to see doctors in foreign countries for good reason – getting a band aid from a hospital in the United States can cost over $600, but you needn’t be as concerned in Brazil. Brazil has a mixed private-public system (as a Canadian, you’ll have to pay either way), but their system is not nearly as expensive as in Canada. If you have an illness you just want checked out while vacationing, try a policlinica. These are essentially walk-in clinics like in Canada. During one visit, I had a bad cough that worried Minha Namorada, so she insisted I go. After less than a fifteen minute wait, and about $30, I had visited a General Practitioner, and he’d suggested some medicines that I could take – of note, I could have chosen to see a specialist in the office, although those were a bit more expensive. Unlike in Canada, GP’s aren’t gatekeepers in Brazil, so you don’t need a referral.  Your only issue then is the language barrier, but time isn’t of the essence in a non-emergency situation – so either call ahead and find out if they speak English, or you can use your phone in a pinch.

When going to the pharmacist to fill any prescription, I generally ask for the generic brand of the medicine. Like in Canada, it is essentially the same product, and getting the brand name is paying for the trademark.