How to dress for Travel

When I dress for travel, I throw aesthetics out the window right away – no matter how good you look at the beginning of your trip, you will never look good after 24 hours of transiting, so I don’t waste effort on that.* Your loved ones will be happy to see you no matter what, and you’ll have a better trip, and be ready to go faster, if you traveled comfortably. So, keeping that in mind, here are my travel suggestions on what to wear:

1. A baggy T-shirt

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Think the type of T-shirt that you would wear as pajamas. You want a T-shirt that doesn’t have buttons that can dig into you. You don’t want to wear anything lighter than a T- shirt, because they don’t exactly have a long time between passengers on planes, and you never know who/what was there before you – thus, its best to minimize contact with the plane seat as much as possible. But, since you can’t control the plane temperature, you may need to strip down to just the shirt to avoid excessive sweating. The T-Shirt being a little bit big also helps it breath.

2. A hoodie with a zipper front

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Again, since you can’t control the temperature it may get a bit cold – the hoodie helps with that. While I try to avoid zippers as much as possible while flying, you won’t know if your plane is too hot or too cold until you are a little bit into your flight, and its awkward to get up, disturbing your seat-mates to remove a pullover, but the T-shirt underneath should help protect the zipper from digging into you in any event. Ideally, the the hoodie will have pockets to hold onto those items you need immediate access to (that you don’t keep in your backpack), and can double as a pillow/blanket if you want to sleep. The pillow they give you on the plane is meant for your lower back to make the seat more comfortable, not for your face.

3. Running tights and compression socks.

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Tights are useful, but can be a bit revealing without more
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Compression socks, also known as diabetic socks, can be found at almost any pharmacy

For long flights, there can be a risk of blood clots or other issues when you sit too long. If you are young/not diabetic, you likely don’t need to be too concerned, but running tights and compression socks still help avoid the muscle ache in your legs that comes from sitting for too long – I’m not saying there will be none, just less. The tights and, especially the compression socks, are specifically designed to encourage blood flow. If you are diabetic, these are a must, since circulation becomes more of an issue, and flying halfway around the world can test anyone’s limits.

4. Sweatpants

Tights look a bit too revealing without anything to cover them, but jeans/slacks have strong zippers, and buttons that can dig into you when you sit in a cramped seat for long flights. Sweat pants breath and help regulate your body temperature, but most importantly are designed with comfort in mind. Ideally, you’ll want ones with pockets again (like your hoodie), but it is not necessary, because your backpack is for items needed on the plane. Storing items in your pockets just makes your clothing less comfortable, hoodie pockets are better for that anyways.

5. Wear a hat

A hat is useful in case you want to sleep and its still bright out. Even if you have a window, there is a good chance someone else’s window will be open and the light will keep you awake. Or, what if your seatmate isn’t able to sleep, so decides to read a book, and turns on the overhead light. Your best solution is to have a hat that will at least dim things for you.

Common mistakes

6. Don’t bring a coat

Depending on your dropoff/pickup you can just have someone bring your coat (that is how Minha Namorada and I handle it). With trains/taxis/ubers you will probably only have a couple minutes of extra cold weather in the worst scenarios. Coats take up lots of luggage space, and believe me, you’ll regret wearing it on the plane, especially once you get anywhere south of Canada.

7. Comfortable shoes don’t matter

You won’t be standing, you won’t be walking. So, it doesn’t matter if they are your most comfortable shoes. Save space in your luggage by wearing the shoes that take up the most amount of space – for me, that’s usually my dress shoes.

8. Use your backpack unless you immediately need an item

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Backpacks can be a lifesaver on long journeys

When you are waiting in line at the airport, then it makes sense to use the pockets (to hold your wallet, tickets, passport etc.) but after the transaction, return the item to your backpack. It helps you remember not to lose things (since you put them away immediately), but it also avoids you getting jabbed by something in your pocket. Otherwise, follow good backpack practice.

* Minha Namorada (my girlfriend) thinks you can look good and travel, but I would rather the extra 1% of comfort.

Cabin Baggage for the Professional Traveler

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The most important part of flying comfortably is to pack correctly – you want to have one carry on bag, that is almost exclusively used for items you will/may need on the plane itself. I say almost exclusively because lost luggage does happen, and its good to have clothes for your first day with you, so that you can still go out before they get your bag returned. You’ll want the following items:

1. Paperwork – Passport, Visa, any other paperwork you need at any point in your flight shouldn’t ever leave your side. The same is true for your travel insurance paperwork, which could be needed at any point in your travels.

2. Cellphone – download the airline’s app, as well as a few shows on Netflix/other streaming service, and music/podcasts. You can’t always download these when in flight, and the airport’s WiFi is always a bit tricky. Bring charging cables with USB end, and an adapter for USB/North American (most airplanes have both outlets, but my experience has been that one is always out of order). Ideally you’d also bring a Brazilian/North American adapter, but those are expensive in Canada, and are better purchased in Brazil.

3. Cellphone Charging block – this is your backup in case both outlets are broken. Most I find can’t keep up with the battery drain from heavy use, but even so, it will significantly extend your battery.

4. Cell phone stand – a lot of airlines have gone to providing in-flight entertainment through personal cellphones. It makes sense, because they don’t have to pay to maintain the hardware, but it can be uncomfortable for long flights. You want a dedicated cellphone stand, that raises your phone up slightly – this way you don’t have to have your neck bent down at an extreme angle for the whole flight. You don’t want it too high, as that risks the phone falling and breaking, but a small distance makes a world of difference.

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This is the cell phone stand I use

4a. Laptop – personally I find that a laptop is a bit cumbersome on the plane, and I actually prefer to watch shows on my cellphone with the stand, because the seats put you so close to the laptop, but to each their own.

5. Headphones – ideally, you’ll have two sets. One earbud style, which is useful for those airlines that only allow this style during takeoff and landing. The other ones you want are Active Noise Cancelling, Over-Ear style. These can be found for less than $100 on Amazon, and are well worth the money. Its a risky purchase online, because youtube videos don’t do them justice, but the trick is to search for 3 star reviews where the complaint isn’t something that bothers you. You don’t need the expensive ones that cancel out all noise, as long as the low-beat of the airplane engines is drowned out, you’ll be able to actually enjoy in-flight entertainment, and sleep much better. These have completely revolutionized flying for me.

6. Candy – If you have trouble sleeping on the flight, a big sugar rush right after the in-flight meal will lead to a sugar crash and may help you nod off to sleep. Having a beer before/on the flight helps with this too.

7. Cash/Card – not everywhere will take card, and not everywhere will take cash – bring both, so you can buy something if you need.

8. Gum – if you have problems with the takeoff and landing, gum can help, although I prefer to just hold my nose and swallow to equalize pressure to avoid the headaches.

9. Medicines – if you need to take them, obviously bring them with you.

You don’t want to bring much more than this with you on the flight, because if the flight is packed, you might have to put your bag under the seat in front of you, and a full bag will take away the precious little leg space you have. Additionally, you’ll want space in your bag for Duty Free purchases.