Farofa

farofa_brazil
User Carioca [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/)%5D
Another great use for Cassava Flour, besides Pao De Queijo, is to make Farofa. Farofa is a very Brazilian dish, its simple to make, and you will find it served regularly with many different types of meals. It is sometimes used as a topping for foods (such as steaks, chicken, or hot dogs), but more commonly you will find it served as a side on it’s own. While a first-time eater might be a bit shy to try it on one’s own, it actually does a great job of satisfying a craving for a starchy side – and it is much healthier to eat than french fries. I think part of the reason why the food works well as a topping or on its own is that Brazilians, much to my personal chagrin, like to mix their food on their plates. So, many foods have remnants that become toppings for the next food. Farofa is not spicy in the least, and I find it is a good replacement for seasoning salt atop steaks (it has some salt, but less than the store-bought seasonings), or for anyone seeking a gluten-free alternative.

What you’ll need:

  • two cups of Cassava Flour
  • One third cup of butter
  • half an onion (small)
  • two cloves of garlic
  • Salt

Steps:

1. Either mince or grate the onion and garlic. Protip: chewing gum can prevent tearing while cutting onions.
2. Melt the butter in a medium size pan on medium heat.
3. Add the garlic and onion, let it fry to a rich golden colour.
4. Add the Cassava Flour and salt to taste. It burns very easily, so do not leave it unattended at this point.
5. Stir/fold the mixture regularly until golden brown, which should take about four minutes.
6. Serve either hot or at room temperature.

meat-1407840_640
I’m not sure if this is using it as a side, or as a seasoning, but its lovely either way!

Cassava aka, Macaxeira, Manioc, or Yuca

manihot_esculenta_-_cross_section_2
Amada44 [CC BY 3.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0)%5D
Cassava, also known as Macaxeira or Yuca, is a staple crop in Brazil, and is a very healthy alternative to add to the North American diet. While it is often made into flour, I find it is more like potatoes than wheat (although it can substitute for both). One of my favourite meals when out with Minha Noiva (my fiancee) is to have Carne De Sole with fried Macaxeira (known as Macaxeira Frita). Cassava flour is also a great alternative for those in need of Gluten-Free products.

However, you have to know how to pick one, and how to prepare it properly. Generally speaking only “sweet” Cassava is available in Canada, which is better, but it is still not safe to consume raw as it contains some cyanide (as do almonds, millet sprouts, lima beans, soy, spinach, and bamboo shoots). Processed Cassava (such as Cassava flour, or chips) will have already been safe to use as-is.

Picking the right Cassava is important – the correct way is to snap off the end and it should only be white (as pictured above). If brown specks appear, then the Cassava should be avoided. I do find it weird to go to the local supermarket and break the products in half before deciding if I’m going to purchase it, but its the only way to check a Cassava, and any store that sells them should know this – so, as awkward as it feels, it’s perfectly normal!

In preparing Cassava, I find it is best to follow the Australian Government’s recommendations, which state that:

  • To make cassava safe to eat, first peel and slice the cassava and then cook it thoroughly either by baking, frying, boiling or roasting. This process reduces the cyanogenic glycosides to safe levels. Frozen cassava and frozen peeled cassava should also be cooked in this way. Discard any cooking water after use.

Cassava can then be used in any way that you use potatoes!

friedmanioc
Macaxeira Frita, essentially, Cassava French Fries – Bdieu [CC BY 3.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0)%5D
If you want to use it as a substitute for flour, buy the premade flour (which is widely available, and can also be found on Amazon), and then replace it 1:1 for regular flour. However, Cassava Flour is lighter, and more water absorbent than regular flour, so here are some baking tips:

1. Since it absorbs more water, it can end up being more dense, so you might want to add slightly less than normal and check consistencies before adding the rest.

2. It may tend to bake faster on the outside, even while the inside remains a bit doughy, so its better on lower temperatures for a bit longer time.

3. It sometimes gives a bit of a nut-flavour to your food.

4. It is very dusty, so be prepared for a slightly bigger mess.

baked-baking-chef-784633

Pão de Queijo

pao de queijo

In my opinion, Pão de Queijo is one of the best foods Brazil has to offer.

Pão de Queijo translates simply as “bread of cheese”, but it is so much more.  Imagine the rolls from Red Lobster (TM), but more moist, and with a soft exterior.

Pão de Queijo is very common in the region of Minas Gerais in Brazil, but can be found anywhere. It is not made with wheat, as its history comes from a time and place where wheat was in short supply. Instead, it is made with a base mostly of Cassava and Tapioca – both staple crops in Brazil. The actual cheese used varies from place to place, but brand name stores, such as the Casa de Pão de Queijo (TM) will be the same across locations.

Pão de Queijo used to be more difficult to make in Canada due to the difficulty in finding Tapioca or Cassava Flour, but the increasing number of individuals with gluten sensitivity (celiac disease or otherwise) has created more of a market for wheat flour alternatives, so tapioca flour can now be found at places like Walmart.

Ingredients:

500 g of Tapioca Flour or Sour Cassava Flour
250 ml of water
250 ml of milk
125 ml of oil
2 eggs
100 g grated Parmesan cheese
salt (as desired)

Instructions:

1. In a pan, boil the water and add the milk, oil and salt.

2. Add the flour, mix well and remove from the heat. This is also a good time to begin to preheat the oven to 350 F.

3. Begin to knead the dough.

4. While the dough is warm, add the parmesan cheese, the eggs and mix well.

5. Using your hands, create small balls of approximately 2 cm in diameter.

6. Place the balls on a non-stick baking dish, leaving a small amount of space between them.

7. Bake in the oven (at 350 F) for about 40 minutes.