Révellion or Brazilian New Year’s Eve

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Just a short article today, as I’m still a bit jet-lagged from my honeymoon.

New Year’s in Brazil is very different, and yet very similar to that in Canada.  I do find the festivities are a little bigger in Brazil – in fact, when I returned to Brazil for my (religious) wedding in February, I already saw advertisements to reserve a table for Réveillion (New Year’s Eve) for this coming December 31st.   While New Year’s has taken on the name Réveillion, it doesn’t have the large dinner that is associated with it in some parts of Canada.

I get the impression from stories of friends that most places where it is warm they ring in the New Year on the beach, and Brazil is no exception.   Entire families go out on New Year’s, and the party does not stop until late into the night/morning.   Roads near the coast tend to be shut down, not by law, but by the giant crowds that flock to the beach.  Even people from the interior tend to travel to the coastal cities for celebrations, and the hotels are massively expensive as a result.  Book early if you are going.

Along with Minha Sogra (my mother in law), we stayed out until at least 5:00 a.m., and we were still some of the first to head home – only one couple (who have young children) that we were out with went home before us.    There was a lot of music, dancing, and drinking throughout the night – remember, in Brazil you can drink on the street.  I heard on the news later that week some people had spent three nights in the beach partying, although at that point I think it’s more accurately just called camping.

Christmas is still the major holiday, but, like here, New Year’s is more for friends – so that’s why the festivities can almost seem larger.  While Minha Sogra was with us, we spent the entire night with Minha Namorada’s best friend and her family – it was especially nice because she and her boyfriend got engaged that night.

There are still lots of religious activities going on for New Year’s Eve, you may find an outdoor religious service or two, and I definitely saw some religious groups doing festivities, but that’s always common in Brazil – religion is a large part of everyday life.

Two days later, Meu Sogro (my father in law) was so excited to take us to visit his small town that he started calling us at 2:30 a.m. to see if we were awake and ready to go yet – that led to a very difficult morning as you can imagine, but is a story for another day.