Révellion or Brazilian New Year’s Eve

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Just a short article today, as I’m still a bit jet-lagged from my honeymoon.

New Year’s in Brazil is very different, and yet very similar to that in Canada.  I do find the festivities are a little bigger in Brazil – in fact, when I returned to Brazil for my (religious) wedding in February, I already saw advertisements to reserve a table for Réveillion (New Year’s Eve) for this coming December 31st.   While New Year’s has taken on the name Réveillion, it doesn’t have the large dinner that is associated with it in some parts of Canada.

I get the impression from stories of friends that most places where it is warm they ring in the New Year on the beach, and Brazil is no exception.   Entire families go out on New Year’s, and the party does not stop until late into the night/morning.   Roads near the coast tend to be shut down, not by law, but by the giant crowds that flock to the beach.  Even people from the interior tend to travel to the coastal cities for celebrations, and the hotels are massively expensive as a result.  Book early if you are going.

Along with Minha Sogra (my mother in law), we stayed out until at least 5:00 a.m., and we were still some of the first to head home – only one couple (who have young children) that we were out with went home before us.    There was a lot of music, dancing, and drinking throughout the night – remember, in Brazil you can drink on the street.  I heard on the news later that week some people had spent three nights in the beach partying, although at that point I think it’s more accurately just called camping.

Christmas is still the major holiday, but, like here, New Year’s is more for friends – so that’s why the festivities can almost seem larger.  While Minha Sogra was with us, we spent the entire night with Minha Namorada’s best friend and her family – it was especially nice because she and her boyfriend got engaged that night.

There are still lots of religious activities going on for New Year’s Eve, you may find an outdoor religious service or two, and I definitely saw some religious groups doing festivities, but that’s always common in Brazil – religion is a large part of everyday life.

Two days later, Meu Sogro (my father in law) was so excited to take us to visit his small town that he started calling us at 2:30 a.m. to see if we were awake and ready to go yet – that led to a very difficult morning as you can imagine, but is a story for another day.

Carnival

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Sérgio (Savaman) Savarese [CC BY 2.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)%5D
One of the things Brazil is most well known for is Carnival. But, most people don’t even know that Carnival is associated with Lent (and accordingly Easter), being a celebration right before the beginning of the forty-days of fasting. So, Carnival actually varies by a couple months every year, the same as Easter does. So, in 2018 Carnival was February 9-14th, but in 2019 it is March 1st-6th.

Most people think about the parades for Carnival (which are the main events), and particularly well known are the Samba Dancers that I’ve discussed before in my misconceptions section. The parades are quite large events, attracting tourists from around the world, and with presentations by schools that prepare year round for a dance competition hosted over four nights.

There are a lot of cultural differences between the various Carnival celebrations, with different variations of music being one of the largest signs. In the Southeast Region, Rio De Janeiro and São Paulo mainly, the music is mostly Samba, in the Northeast Region you’ll find more Frevo, and in areas like Salvador, Axé Music the look and style of each dancing troupe will vary significantly along cultural lines as well.  When you think about Carnival, odds are you are thinking about  the Southeast regions, like Rio De Janeiro and São Paulo, as those are the two most famous celebrations.

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Typical Samba dancers, from the Southeast Regions,  – PlidaoUrbenia [CC BY-SA 3.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)%5D
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Frevo dancers from the Northeastern Region – Prefeitura de Olinda [CC BY 2.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)%5D
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One of the most famous Axé singers, Daniela Mercury.  Axé Music started out as an attempted derogatory term to refer to any musicians from Salvador, but the derogatory nature of the term never took shape, and now it simply described this genre of music  – Agecom [CC BY 2.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)%5D
There is some variation in that cities such as São Paulo prefer more confined isolated Samba parades, with less interaction from the public, with the main official competition actually taking place in the “Sambadrome.” Whereas areas like Recife and Belo Horizonte allow for more public involvement in the parades themselves.

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The Sambadrome Marquês de Sapucaí, in Rio de Janeiro – Agência Brasil/Marco Antonio Cavalcanti [CC BY 3.0 br (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/br/deed.en)%5D
Beyond that Carnival is very similar to Mardi Gras, or other themed week-long celebrations (like the Calgary Stampede). If you have ever been to Calgary for the Stampede, and seen just how into it the whole city gets, imagine that on a country-wide scale, but less cowboys.

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Foto:Antônio Cruz/ABr [CC BY 3.0 br (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/br/deed.en)%5D